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Facts and figures about ethnic difference & inequality in the UK

General Health

7 groups: Health Survey for England, 2004  |   14 groups: Census, 2001

Graph 1: General health 2004: 7 ethnic groups

Source: Health Survey for England 2004

Graph 1 data in Excel

Informants were asked to rate their general health selecting one of five categories: very good, good, fair, bad, or very bad. Results are presented for the worst two categories combined ('bad or very bad').

Among the general population, the levels of general health reported by men and women were the same as in the previous HSE year (2003). Around three quarters of the general population (77% of men and 74% of women) reported good or very good health, and 6% of men and 7% of women reported bad or very bad health.

Overall the minority ethnic groups followed this pattern, with the majority of people reporting good or very good general health, and a much lower proportion reporting bad or very bad health (see Graph 1).

About one in seven Bangladeshi men (15%), and one in ten Pakistani men (10%), reported 'bad' or 'very bad' health. The lowest prevalence of bad/very bad health was among Black African and Chinese men (4%) and men in the general population (6%).

The proportion of women in the general population who reported 'bad' or 'very bad' health was similar to that of men (7%). Around one in seven Bangladeshi and Pakistani women reported bad/very bad health (14% and 15% respectively). As with men, the lowest prevalence was among Chinese women (3%).

Copyright © 2011, Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. All rights reserved.

Graph 2: Age-standardised self-reported bad or very bad general health, by ethnic minority group, 2004

England

Aged 16 and over

Risk ratios

Source: Figure 2A, Health Survey for England 2004: The Health of Minority Ethnic Groups - headline tables, published by The Information Centre, 2006(1)

Graph 2 data not available

Age-standardised risk ratios were analysed in order to control for differences in the age profiles of different ethnic groups (since age is related to health outcomes and behaviours).

Bangladeshi and Pakistani men and women and Black Caribbean women were more likely to report bad or very bad health than the general population. In relation to the general population the risk ratios for bad or very bad health were 3.77 for Bangladeshi men, 4.02 for Bangladeshi women, 2.33 for Pakistani men, 3.54 for Pakistani women, and 1.90 for Black Caribbean women. Chinese women were the only group less likely to report bad or very bad health (with a risk ratio of 0.55) than the general population.

Sources:

Commentary from: Health Survey for England, 2004: The health of minority ethnic groups, Volume I.(2)

Graph 1 data from: Table 2.1, The Health of Minority Ethnic Groups - headline tables (1)

Copyright © 2011, Re-used with the permission of The Health and Social Care Information Centre. All rights reserved.

 

Web addresses

(1) http://www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/hlthsvyeng2004ethnic/HealthSurveyForEngland161205_PDF%20.pdf

(2) http://www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/healthsurvey2004ethnicfull/HealthSurveyforEnglandVol1_210406_PDF.pdf